Tag Archives: Poverty

‪How Sanitation Can Save the World‬‏

Explaining Poverty Evolution The Case of Mozambique 

Measuring poverty remains a complex and contentious issue. This is particularly true in sub-Saharan Africa where poverty rates are higher, information bases typically weaker, and the underlying determinants of welfare relatively volatile. This paper employs recently collected data on household consumption in Mozambique to examine the evolution of consumption poverty with focus on the period 2002/03 to 2008/09. The paper contributes in four areas. First, the period in question was characterized by major movements in international commodity prices. Mozambique provides an illuminating case study of the implications of these world commodity price changes for living standards of poor people. Second, a novel ‘backcasting’ approach using a computable general equilibrium model of Mozambique, linked to a poverty module is introduced. Third, the backcasting approach is also employed to rigorously examine the poverty-growth-inequality triangle. Finally, various simple but useful and rarely applied approaches to considering regional changes in poverty rates are presented. The authors find that the national poverty rate in Mozambique stagnated between 2002/03 and 2008/09.

Explaining Poverty Evolution The Case of Mozambique 

Measuring poverty remains a complex and contentious issue. This is particularly true in sub-Saharan Africa where poverty rates are higher, information bases typically weaker, and the underlying determinants of welfare relatively volatile. This paper employs recently collected data on household consumption in Mozambique to examine the evolution of consumption poverty with focus on the period 2002/03 to 2008/09. The paper contributes in four areas. First, the period in question was characterized by major movements in international commodity prices. Mozambique provides an illuminating case study of the implications of these world commodity price changes for living standards of poor people. Second, a novel ‘backcasting’ approach using a computable general equilibrium model of Mozambique, linked to a poverty module is introduced. Third, the backcasting approach is also employed to rigorously examine the poverty-growth-inequality triangle. Finally, various simple but useful and rarely applied approaches to considering regional changes in poverty rates are presented. The authors find that the national poverty rate in Mozambique stagnated between 2002/03 and 2008/09.

Internet Becoming a Requirement for Prosperity in the Global Economy #EMCampNM

The world’s top economies are increasingly dependent on the Internet, according to a new report by the McKinsey Global Institute.

Measuring the percent GDP growth attributed to the Internet in Brazil, China, India, South Korea, Sweden, and the G-8 countries, the report found that the broadband sector is booming. According to the findings:

“On average, the Internet contributes 3.4 percent to GDP in the 13 countries covered by the research — an amount the size of Spain or Canada in terms of GDP, and growing at a faster rate than that of Brazil … if measured as a sector, Internet-related consumption and expenditure is now bigger than agriculture or energy.”

Continues at speedmatters.org

ONE App That Could Change the World

Hooray for the One Campaign and their release of their very own iPhone app!


Healthy Food Hard to Access for Poor Neighborhoods (via @yoxi_play on FB)

A focus on healthy living has been front and center in the past few years, with a special focus on First Lady Michelle Obama’s Let’s Move campaign to fight childhood obesity. Last week the newswires and blogs were buzzing about Beyoncé joining the First Lady’s fight to end childhood obesity. In a video with middle school kids, Beyoncé is putting a fun spin on healthy eating habits and exercise through dance. But healthy eating isn’t as easy as one may expect for disadvantaged people living in poor neighborhoods.

CWS: at work fighting malnutrition

Poverty News Blog: New Food Security Project map from InterAction

InterAction has a great new tool on their website that helps to show the many food security programs around the world. The Food Security Map is an interactive tool that organizes all of the food and agriculture programs by country, the organization giving the aid, and a description of each project.

For example, you can click on the country Mauritania and see where the food security programs are concentrated at and a brief description of their work. In Mauritania ,World Vision conducts two out of the three programs, one providing support to farmers and another that helps to develop an entire community.

InterAction hopes the map will begin to create more cooperation between their member charities. They also hope that it will give donors more information on how to give to specific projects.

One striking bit of information found from this map is the glut of programs going on in Haiti. The map displays 104 different food security projects in the tiny island nation. The only other nation with that many is Bangladesh. Many say that it is the overwhelming amount of humanitarian aid received that keeps the nation from ever becoming self-sufficient. This map might give more evidence to that point of view.

The Food Security Map can be found at InterAction by hitting this link. Below is a screen-shot of the map.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Advanced economies cope better with disasters

It has always seemed to me that the worst devastation in natural disasters befalls the poor. That is not to say that people with money cannot be harmed but the ability to adapt plays a significant role in recovery from any situation.

By Alan Wheatley, Global Economics CorrespondentPosted 2011/03/13 at 10:16 am EDT

BEIJING, Mar. 13, 2011 (Reuters) — The earthquake that devastated northeast Japan displaced the country’s main island by 2.4 meters and even tilted the axis of the Earth by nearly 10 centimeters. The shock sounds awesome but it was imperceptible. History suggests the same will be true of the economic impact.

Smoke and scattered containers are seen at a devastated factory area after an earthquake and tsunami in Sendai, northern Japan, March 13, 2011. REUTERS/Kim Kyung-Hoon


The instinctive reaction when viewing the extensive damage and frantic efforts to secure damaged nuclear reactors is to assume economic havoc will follow.

But researchers who have studied similar disasters in rich countries reach a reassuring conclusion: human resilience and resourcefulness, allied to an ability to draw down accumulated wealth, enable economies to rebound quickly from what seem at first to be unbearable inflictions – be it the September 11, 2001, attacks on New York or Friday’s 8.9-magnitude earthquake, the worst in Japan’s history.

Read the rest at newsdaily.com

Hans Rosling’s new insights on poverty

http://video.ted.com/assets/player/swf/EmbedPlayer.swf