Tag Archives: Music

Song based on the woman who scratched an itch until she reached her brain – Boing Boing

Song based on the woman who scratched an itch until she reached her brain

If you haven’t read this 2008 New Yorker article about a woman who had a chronic itch on her head and over time scratched through her skull in till she reached her brain, here it is. And when you’re finished, give this song a listen. Singer-songwriter Teddy Blanks was inspired by the article to compose and record The Itch.

In “The Itch,” Atul Gawande wrote about a woman called M. who couldn’t stop scratching an itch on her head, so much so that, at some point, she scratched all the way to her brain. It was a gruesome read for some of us — little, imaginary itches began to sprout, and it was impossible not to scratch. But for the singer-songwriter Teddy Blanks, it was an inspiration. Blanks remembers reading the article one day on the train and was, as he puts it, “squirming in my seat.” Later that night, as he tried to write, he saw The New Yorker on his bedside table. Unable to get Gawande’s words out of his head, he composed his own “Itch,” a little ditty about, well, itching.

 

BPS Research Digest: Scientists who rock

Joseph LeDoux

The review journal Trends in Cognitive Sciences has a reflective essay in-press written by Joseph LeDoux, a neuroscientist and performer with the Amygdaloids, a band that sings songs about “love and life peppered with insights drawn from research about mind and brain and mental disorders”.

As well as providing interesting background info on the Amygdaloids (they’re currently working on a EP called In Our Minds), LeDoux reflects on why so many scientists are drawn to music, and he talks about the benefits that performing music has brought to his own life and work. “Playing music makes me a healthier, happier person,” he says. “It not only connects me with others in a unique way, it also makes connections in my own mind, drawing up emotions and thoughts I didn’t know I had.”

BPS Research Digest: Scientists who rock

Joseph LeDoux

The review journal Trends in Cognitive Sciences has a reflective essay in-press written by Joseph LeDoux, a neuroscientist and performer with the Amygdaloids, a band that sings songs about “love and life peppered with insights drawn from research about mind and brain and mental disorders”.

As well as providing interesting background info on the Amygdaloids (they’re currently working on a EP called In Our Minds), LeDoux reflects on why so many scientists are drawn to music, and he talks about the benefits that performing music has brought to his own life and work. “Playing music makes me a healthier, happier person,” he says. “It not only connects me with others in a unique way, it also makes connections in my own mind, drawing up emotions and thoughts I didn’t know I had.”

Great White Sharks Apparently Enjoy Songs by AC/DC : TreeHugger

great white shark smiling photo Photo: hermanusbackpackers / cc

Conventional wisdom would suggest that the best way to lure great white sharks is to bait the water with chum, but one Australian ocean tour operator says he’s found something that works even better: hard rock. It’s been known for a while now that some music has the power to repel sharks, though evidently particular tunes can have the opposite effect — specifically hits from the band AC/DC. While it may seem a bit far-fetched that the ocean predators would have a soft spot for hit-making Aussie rockers, the logic is actually, well, sound.

According to a report from Adelaide Now, shark tour operator Matt Waller discovered the fish-friendlier alternative to chum, saying music is even more effective at luring great white sharks than ground-up fish. He consulted shark experts and found that the animals are most attracted to sounds within a specific frequency — and one band seems to strike the right chord.

Continues at treehugger.com

The Grand Rapids LipDub (NEW WORLD RECORD)

Pure Michigan, indeed! You go Grand Rapids!

String Theory: Violinist Taps Artificial Intelligence to Interact with Her Unique Sound

music, computer,Japan

MARI KIMURA: The violinist displayed her knack for experimentation during a May 20 show sponsored by the Vilcek Foundation at New York City’s Bohemian National Hall. On her right bow hand she wore a white fingerless glove laden with sensors that let her communicate wirelessly with her laptop as she played.
Image: COURTESY OF THE VILCEK FOUNDATION

Halfway into a recent performance at New York City’s Bohemian National Hall violinist Mari Kimura had already performed “Preludio” from Bach’s  Partita No. 3 in E Major followed by several pieces in which she deftly demonstrated her innovative “subharmonics” techniques for extending the octave range of her instrument. Then things got really interesting.

Kimura donned a white fingerless glove laden with wireless sensors, plugged her “augmented” violin into her laptop onstage, and proceeded to demonstrate how she is redefining the relationship musicians have with both their instruments and their music. After a few moments setting up her interactive bowing technology Kimura launched into her composition Voyage Apollonian, during which her bow strokes controlled an animation sequence created by New York University computer science professor Ken Perlin. As she played, the glove’s sensors sent data to software running on her laptop, prompting a black-and-white butterfly on the large screen behind her to morph into various shapes and patterns before returning to its original winged configuration.

The sensors are part of module that includes 3-D accelerometers and three axis gyroscopes as well as a wireless transmitter that sends data about Kimura’s bowing to her computer as she plays. The module functions as an electronic controller for real-time digital sound processes, such as sound transformation and sound synthesis, says Frédéric Bevilacqua, who leads the Paris Institut de Recherche et Coordination Acoustique/Musique’s (IRCAM) Real-Time Musical Interactions Team, which developed the module.

Read the rest at scientificamerican.com

Pimp my aid worker

Pimp my aid worker

 

Oh God…

Video via www.pimpmyaid.org, no kidding!

 

I’m… umm.. I… Oh, heck, I have no idea what to say about this.