Tag Archives: Disabilities

Ageing and Disability in Humanitarian Response: A Resource Book on Inclusive Practices | ReliefWeb

This is just the preface. If you click through to the original at the bottom, you’ll find a download link on that page.

PREFACE

Older Persons 7%2 (of the total population) and persons with disabilities 10%3 (of the total population) equaling at least 3 million persons affected by the floods. Due to the massive extent of the floods and ensuing crisis, and relying on repeated past experience of such crises, persons with disabilities and older persons are forgotten in the humanitarian response and reconstruction phase. Response by the main agencies is designed uniformly and therefore does not take into account the particular vulnerabilities and contributions of different groups within the population such as persons with hearing, visual, physical and intellectual disabilities, (man, women and children) older persons (man, women). If particular attention is not paid towards their inclusion and participation in the humanitarian response, these persons will remain largely “invisible” and will not be in a position to access properly and equally relief and early recovery response initiatives.

To ensure that older persons and persons with disabilities are included in the emergency and early recovery response in Pakistan via mainstreaming Aging and Disability Task Force was formulated in September 2010.

Publication of this report comes at a time when the Government of Pakistan has further demonstrated its commitment to improve the lives of Persons with Disabilities through ratifying the UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities4. It aims to secure for the estimated 650 million persons with disabilities (including women with disabilities) across the world the same human rights as so called “non-disabled persons” have – and on an equal basis with them.

Pakistan is a signatory to the 2002 Madrid International Plan of Action on Ageing, which calls for each older person to have a secure income, access to health care, a safe place to live, an opportunity to participate in the community, opportunities for continuous learning and personal growth, protection from harm from those he/she should be able to trust, and the right to make decisions for him/herself.

This report brings together the available evidence to review how International NGOs, NGOs, Disabled People Organizations and other stakeholders contributing in disability and ageing sector with mainstreaming of disability and/or ageing issues in their mandate.

In producing this report we became aware that there was a lot of useful data collected by ADTF member organizations which have helped ADTF to review the areas for further progress. However it has also become apparent that more needs to be done to ensure consistent data collection disaggregated by impairment type, gender and age is still to be initiated throughout the humanitarian response.

This report outlines the ADTF Member’s organizations commitment towards mainstreaming Aging and Disability in humanitarian response, with the support of Protection Thematic Working Group and future endeavors of ADTF. This report concludes by acknowledging the steady progress ADTF have made to date whilst recognizing the continued need for focused action and developing technical guidelines initially for Health, WASH and Shelter.

The ADTF has concluded that progress needs to be accelerated on establishing a new social model, which draws a system where:

  • Emergency relief stakeholders (donors and implementing partners) have improved knowledge and understanding on ageing and disability issues in Pakistan

  • Actors of the emergency response (International and local NGOs, Agencies, Gov bodies and funding organizations) have increased capacity to include Older Persons and Persons with Disabilities into in their activities

  • The concerns and voices of all types of disabilities and older persons (gender sensitive) are more comprehensively represented in the design and implementation of the ADTF activities

This process needs to be based on integration, where people participate fully and are supported to individually access the full range of opportunities that are open to everyone else.

The success of implementing the Ageing and Disability Task Force mandate depends on the contribution of many stakeholders, but most of all Government, UN Humanitarian Actors, Disabled People’s Organizations, NGOs and INGOs, who must give a lead on implementing the process of change.

We fully recognize the resource implications and urge all stakeholders to begin the necessary process of reform their policies and strategies for the inclusion of Persons with Disabilities and Older Persons.

ADTF is committed to advocate for the rights of Persons with disabilities and older persons and their inclusion in emergency and development initiatives.

Abia Akram (Ms.)
Coordinator Ageing and Disability Task Force

 

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Ageing and Disability in Humanitarian Response: A Resource Book on Inclusive Practices | ReliefWeb

This is just the preface. If you click through to the original at the bottom, you’ll find a download link on that page.

PREFACE

Older Persons 7%2 (of the total population) and persons with disabilities 10%3 (of the total population) equaling at least 3 million persons affected by the floods. Due to the massive extent of the floods and ensuing crisis, and relying on repeated past experience of such crises, persons with disabilities and older persons are forgotten in the humanitarian response and reconstruction phase. Response by the main agencies is designed uniformly and therefore does not take into account the particular vulnerabilities and contributions of different groups within the population such as persons with hearing, visual, physical and intellectual disabilities, (man, women and children) older persons (man, women). If particular attention is not paid towards their inclusion and participation in the humanitarian response, these persons will remain largely “invisible” and will not be in a position to access properly and equally relief and early recovery response initiatives.

To ensure that older persons and persons with disabilities are included in the emergency and early recovery response in Pakistan via mainstreaming Aging and Disability Task Force was formulated in September 2010.

Publication of this report comes at a time when the Government of Pakistan has further demonstrated its commitment to improve the lives of Persons with Disabilities through ratifying the UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities4. It aims to secure for the estimated 650 million persons with disabilities (including women with disabilities) across the world the same human rights as so called “non-disabled persons” have – and on an equal basis with them.

Pakistan is a signatory to the 2002 Madrid International Plan of Action on Ageing, which calls for each older person to have a secure income, access to health care, a safe place to live, an opportunity to participate in the community, opportunities for continuous learning and personal growth, protection from harm from those he/she should be able to trust, and the right to make decisions for him/herself.

This report brings together the available evidence to review how International NGOs, NGOs, Disabled People Organizations and other stakeholders contributing in disability and ageing sector with mainstreaming of disability and/or ageing issues in their mandate.

In producing this report we became aware that there was a lot of useful data collected by ADTF member organizations which have helped ADTF to review the areas for further progress. However it has also become apparent that more needs to be done to ensure consistent data collection disaggregated by impairment type, gender and age is still to be initiated throughout the humanitarian response.

This report outlines the ADTF Member’s organizations commitment towards mainstreaming Aging and Disability in humanitarian response, with the support of Protection Thematic Working Group and future endeavors of ADTF. This report concludes by acknowledging the steady progress ADTF have made to date whilst recognizing the continued need for focused action and developing technical guidelines initially for Health, WASH and Shelter.

The ADTF has concluded that progress needs to be accelerated on establishing a new social model, which draws a system where:

  • Emergency relief stakeholders (donors and implementing partners) have improved knowledge and understanding on ageing and disability issues in Pakistan

  • Actors of the emergency response (International and local NGOs, Agencies, Gov bodies and funding organizations) have increased capacity to include Older Persons and Persons with Disabilities into in their activities

  • The concerns and voices of all types of disabilities and older persons (gender sensitive) are more comprehensively represented in the design and implementation of the ADTF activities

This process needs to be based on integration, where people participate fully and are supported to individually access the full range of opportunities that are open to everyone else.

The success of implementing the Ageing and Disability Task Force mandate depends on the contribution of many stakeholders, but most of all Government, UN Humanitarian Actors, Disabled People’s Organizations, NGOs and INGOs, who must give a lead on implementing the process of change.

We fully recognize the resource implications and urge all stakeholders to begin the necessary process of reform their policies and strategies for the inclusion of Persons with Disabilities and Older Persons.

ADTF is committed to advocate for the rights of Persons with disabilities and older persons and their inclusion in emergency and development initiatives.

Abia Akram (Ms.)
Coordinator Ageing and Disability Task Force

 

World’s First Dog With All Bionic Legs: Naki’o Can Play Again With 4 Prosthetic Paws (VIDEO)

You might remember Polo, the husky fitted with a prosthetic paw after being hit by a car, or Midnite, the miniature horse who took off running when first fitted with a prosthetic leg, but this red heeler pup takes being a bionic animal to a whole new level.

Naki’o is the world’s first dog to be fitted with a complete set of four prosthetic paws, according to incrediblefeatures.com. Naki’o was barely 5 weeks old when him and his brothers and sisters were abandoned by a family fleeing their foreclosed home. Having barely survived the Nebraskan winter, all four of the dog’s paws were deformed into rounded stumps after being stuck in an icy puddle.

Incrediblefeatures.com reports that Veterinary technician Christie Tomlinson “organized a fundraiser to pay for Naki’o to have his two back legs fitted with prosthetics.”

From the site:

He took to these so enthusiastically, that Orthopets decided to complete the process free of charge. It was the first time they’d fitted an animal with a complete set of new legs.

Now, Naki’o is able to run, jump and play just like other dogs, thanks to the second chance his new set of legs have given him.

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Device Allows Disabled to Drive With One Hand (via @dcfemella @amplog)

One-handed-driving-556

“Ten and two.” If you took a driver’s education class, there’s a good chance you had that phrase drilled into your brain by an instructor advising you two think of the steering wheel as the face of a clock, always keeping both hands on the wheel — one at 10 o’clock and the other at 2 o’clock.

But for people with zero or reduced mobility in any of their upper or lower limbs, keeping both hands on the steering wheel and feet ready at the pedals can present some difficult challenges.

While cars car easily be modified to accommodate drivers of all shapes, sizes and mobility levels, a team of Spanish researchers recently created a single device that lets a driver steer, accelerate, change gears and brake with just one hand.

Developed by Asociación RUVID, a consortium of five Spanish research institutes and companies, the prototype is completely electronic. Having no mechanics involved helps those who may have reduced strength in the device-operating hand. As well, motors in the device are used to simulate the haptic feedback and sensations of a traditional, mechanical steering wheel.

“When designing a new system [we] wanted to eliminate our concept of the mechanical technology and implement technology based on electronics, which offers more versatile solutions,” said  team leader José Solaz in an RUVID news release.

The prototype was recently presented during the 13th EAEC European Automotive Congress in Valencia, Spain.

[Via Gizmag]

Credit: FICOSA International S.A.

Dennis Hong: Making a car for blind drivers

NeuroLogica Blog » Paraplegic Man Walks with Spinal Stimulation

Scientists report in the Lancet a case of a 23 year old man paralyzed from the chest down who was able to learn to stand and walk with the aid of a spinal stimulator. This is an interesting advance, but news reports are careful to point out (correctly) that it is not a cure.

Rob Summers suffered an car accident in 2006 that damaged his spinal cord at the T1 level – just below the neck. This would mostly (although not completely) spare his arms, but render him weak in the legs. According to the case report he had no detectable leg movement and lost bladder control but had partial sensation in the legs. This is an important detail to put this case into perspective – Summers’ injury was partial, if severe. This means there were some neurons that were spared.

Sign language breaks down communication barriers

Sign language breaks down communication barriers

Afshan Ahmed

Last Updated: May 9, 2011

SHARJAH // Alanoud Ibrahim and Reema Nitham are frantically waving their hands, engrossed in a conversation about a natural disaster.

The Grade 11 pupils at Al Amal School for the Deaf at the Sharjah City for Humanitarian Services can lip read and follow expressions. They can also express themselves using visual aids or by writing.

Mahmoud Ramadan, their classmate, joins in the debate as their sign language instructor supervises.

“For a long time, deaf people were thought to be stupid and not able enough to be a part of society,” says Alanoud, an Emirati, with the help of Wael Samir, her instructor. “That is slowly changing, though in many instances we are still discriminated against.”

The 78 pupils at Al Amal, which follows the Ministry of Education curriculum, are earning their high-school diplomas and have big ambitions for the future.

However, very few mainstream schools have the resources and therapists to help them to realise their goals. Without formal sign-language training courses, pupils who are deaf often pick up the language informally.

At Al Amal, teachers make greater use of visual aids than of auditory teaching, explains Afaaf al Haredi, the manager of the institute.

“We include things like drama and debate, and concentrate more on learning by doing,” she says. “We also have technological aids like interactive boards and multimedia to teach them.”

The school was established in 1979, starting out with 12 pupils at a British army camp in Al Yarmouk, Sharjah. In the beginning they borrowed the Kuwaiti syllabus, earning ministry accreditation in 1995.

“Many of our students wish to go on to university and our affiliation to the ministry allows them to do so,” says Ms al Haredi.

The institute strives to integrate pupils into mainstream education where possible, having sent about 56 into private and public classrooms since 1990.

“Many of our students have also graduated from university and have jobs,” she adds.

She plans to visit several US schools this spring, to learn how they integrate children with disabilities.

“When I return, I will share that experience with my peers and hope to give a presentation to schools on how they can adopt those practices.”

aahmed@thenational.ae